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15th March 2015

Assessment of Buildings

CLOSING THE PERFORMANCE GAP  จC THE 2020 AMBITION

From 2020, be able to demonstrate that at least 90% of all new homes meet or perform better than the designed energy / carbon performance. There is now clear evidence of a gap between the designed and as-built energy performance of new homes. This gap can arise in a number of ways within the overall house-building process and, if significant and widespread, represents a number of risks.

AIR TIGHTNESS AND VENTILATION IN UK DWELLINGS – A SENSITIVE BALANCE!

 

INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY IN REFURBISHMENT

Unfortunately, much that was once known about creating healthy indoor environments has been overlooked in recent years. There is also a notable lack of published data on indoor environmental quality in highly energyฉ\efficient buildings (including both indoor air quality and other health factors, such as heating, lighting and ventilation). This report shows:

  • The health effects of sealing buildings and of other measures now used to improve energy performance have not been properly assessed.
  • Low energy refurbishment could have unintended and adverse consequences. These include reduced indoor air quality and reduced natural lighting, together with overheating and other hazards.
  • Rather than refurbish older building types to match the conditions now required in newฉ\built ones, a combination of radiant heating and natural ventilation might create a healthier, more sustainable environment.
  • With a combination of radiant heating and natural ventilation, air change rates could be higher than those currently specified. This would reduce the risk of health problems associated with poor indoor air quality.
  • Another way to improve indoor air quality would be to avoid specifying materials and products that emit hazardous chemicals or prevent the movement of moisture.